BAE Systems’ New Comm Network Links Drones, Military Equipment

BAE Systems has unveiled a communication network that can link “everything” from small reconnaissance drones to armored vehicles, warships, fighter jets, and military commands.

Called the NetVIPR, the communication network comprises a series of nodes, each capable of securely adding, accessing, and moving data.

According to the company, integrating multiple nodes maintains optimum network speed and information flow even if nodes are damaged or destroyed.

NetVIPR reportedly utilizes the “full spectrum of communications infrastructure” to avoid relying on satellites or other fixed infrastructure often targeted by opposing forces.

The network also uses the latest software to perform functions usually carried out by hardware.

“Traditional military networks rely on hardware being set up and then maintained by specialists,” BAE Systems states, adding that the software NetVIPR uses can be updated from remote locations, “providing uninterrupted network access and data transmission.”

NetVIPR provides intelligent and secure military communication networks. Photo: BAE Systems

‘A Complex Challenge’

BAE Systems pointed out that militaries worldwide must maintain control of their communications, especially as today’s multi-domain battlefield becomes more contested.

The company said it had already tested the capabilities of its NetVIPR on a range of equipment and demonstrated its integration with existing military radio systems.

It also showed how the network management interface allows operators to configure and monitor the network.

“Building deployable communications networks in an operational battlespace is a complex challenge,” NetVIPR development lead Dave Sullivan said.

“NetVIPR is a software solution providing an intelligent, flexible, and secure network that can be deployed from command headquarters all the way down to uncrewed air vehicles or other new autonomous platforms.”

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